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WHAT HAPPENED IN 1630? 

As public speakers In Boston are becoming 
more and more Tercentenary-conscious (to coin 
a hideous phrase), they should be certain of 
their historical facts before eloquently elabor- 
ating them. Many settlements were established 
in New England during the first half of the 
seventeenth century, and their three hundredth 
anniversaries have been celebrated recently or 
will be in the next few years. It is therefore 
well to know precisely what event we shall 
commemorate in 1930. Incidentally, it had 
nothing to do with the Separatists or Pilgrims 
who established themselves at Plymouth in 1620. 
On March 4, 1629, a group of Puritans ob- 
tained from King Charles I of England a charter 
I which incorporated them as "The Governor and 
Company of Massachusetts Bay in New Eng- 
land." This gave them the ownership of "all that 
part of New England in America" bounded on 
the south by a line drawn three miles south of 
the Charles River and on the north by a line 
drawn three miles north of the Merrimac River 
and extending from the Atlantic Ocean on the 
east "to the south sea (the Pacific Ocean) on the 
west." This took in several land grants previ- 
ously given by the Council for New England, in- 
cluding Salem, settled in 1628 by John Endicott 
and others who joined the Massachusetts Bay 
Company. 

In April, 1630, nearly a thousand men and 
women set sail from England in eleven ships, 
led by John Winthrop, and taking with' them 
their precious charter. In June the? landed and 
soon established the towns of Boston, Charles- 
town, Newtowne (Cambridge), Medford, Water- 
town, Roxbury, Lynn and Dorchester. In vhe 
next decade about 20,000 others followed them 
and the company's settlement prospered far be- 
yond any other colony in the New World. 



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MASS A CHU SETTS 
I BAT 

ITERCEMTEMARY 

^630 ^f|i|J|^f 1930 

{ in New En&lancL 
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Official Poster Adopted to Further Public ily of Massachusetts Bay Tercentenary 



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YANKEE CORN FOR JOHN BULL 



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From a Held along- tAe York road in 
Battersea, England, a fine crop of Amer- 
ican corn was cut this year, or at any 
rate so says the London Chronicle. The 
English call American corn maize, and 
they never have grown much of it be- 
cause of antagonistic climatic conditions. 
However, this year they have some good 
English-grown American corn and as, of 
course, is entirely natural, the English 
folk say it has a much finer flavor than 
any corn grown in the United States. 

During the war in the fields in one 
section of France American soldiers oc- 
casionally saw American corn growing. 
They were at some pains to recognize it 
because the plants were dwarfed and 
feeble, but it was American corn never- 
theless. The French said that it made 
fairly good fodder, but that they did not 
think much of the edible quality of the 
ears when the sun and soil' together suc- 
ceeded in bringing any ears into being. 

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prejudice against corn. Ernest P. Bjck- ' 









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nel , who on behaif of the Red Cross was 
trying to feed the starving people in 
Poland in war time, offered them large 
quantities jf Indian meal Although the 
peasantry were famishing they refused 
t what was ottered, saying that they 
had neard that anybody who ate Ameri- 
can corn in anjy form was certain to die 
or some dreadfiil disease. 

Confronted Mtn this situation it be- 
came necessary for the Red Cross people 
to take the co(-n away and to substitute 
wheat, which was much harder to get 
and much more expensive. Somebody 
over iv. Poland had heard somewhere that 
a disease called pellagra was traceable 
to a diet of corn products. 

If England lias produced a better fla- 
vored corn than America grows in' it^- 
kltchen gardens, the englishman who can 
get hold of the ears has a treat. [Chicago 
Post 



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Third Axmiver8ary 



KEDSTOHE SCHOOL 



PROGRAM 



Salute to the Flag 
Minuet in G 

Rythmic Band. 
Ace of Diamonds 

Rythmic Band 
Welcome 

Jane Way 
Early History of Redstone School 

Miss Hopkins 
Musical Selection 

Miss Allen 
My Trip to the Canal Zone 

Earnest Little 
"Mary Had a Little Lamb" 

Moving Picture 
Singing 

All the School Children 



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PAUL REVERE, CRAFTSMAN 

[From the New York Sun] 

Paul was a skilful worker in gold, 
silver and copper. He was regarded as 
an excellent dentist. He was an expert 
at framing pictures. He made fine belts, 
good cannon and gunpowder of prime 
quality. He was an iron molder and a i 
smelter of copper. He dealt in hardware 
and notions. He drew snappy cartoons 
and engraved them handsomely. He 
fashioned designs for Continental paper 
currency. He designed attractive book- 
plates. At odd times he served as coron- 
er, composed Masonic lectures, contract- 
ed for various public works, helped or- 
ganize a fire insurance company, super- 
vised the education of sixteen sons and 
daughters, proved himself an affectionate 
husband to the two ladles who succes- 
sively married him, and ran errands for 
am' patriotic society or public leader who 
had genuine need of him. 

He seems to have done well everything 
to which he put his hand. There are 
tankards, gravy boats, pitchers, mugs, 
and the like wrougnt in silver and 
gold by his hand, which compare with 
the best samples of the handiwork of to- 
Some seventy-five bells of his mak- 
ing are still in use in churches and town 
halls of New England. He not only could 
make chimes, but he could play them, 
too. He made boilers for early Hudson 
river boats. If he were living today, 
some one hundred and eleven years r 

the, date of his death, hejnight a. 
incorporate himself as a one-man vertical 
trust. 



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OBSERVE BIRTHDAY 
OF GEN. ROBERT E LEE 

STRATFORD. Va., Jan. 19 ,AP)- 

P^m^K 0f ♦"!? R ° bert E - Lee Memorial 
Foundation today observed the birthday 

2 v. Lee i ln the stra «ord hall room, 
where he was born 123 years ago 

Mrs. Charles D. Lanier, president of 
the national foundation, delivered the 
invocation. Poems about Lee were read 
by Miss Ethel Arms of Grppnw-h Ct 
national secretary, of the foundation.. " 



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A delightful feature of our Annual Meeting — the Roadside Market designed and built, 
and completely stoc\ed with miniature produce by our President, Mrs. Henry Ford. 



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Whiting Hall School for Bogs 

SOUTH SUDBURY, MASS. 

CHARLES AIKEN. Headmaster 



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An Evening of Plays 



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WAYSIDE INN 
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19th, 1930 

Eight o'clock P.M. 




Tickets 50 cents, Children 25 cents 



Proceeds for School Library Fund 



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WAYS IDF. INN TRADE SCHOOL 
WASHINGTON'S 3LRTHDAY EXERCISES 

February 22, 1930 



Opening Selection 

Salute to the Flag 

Duet - Mount Vernon Bells 

Reading - George Washington 

Song - Star-Spangled Banner 

Prayer 

Solo - "Let us have peace'' 

Dedicated to the cause of peace the V/orld 
over, and to Hon. William H. Taft at the 
time he was President of the United States 

Address - Our Debt to Washington 

Duet - "The Old Rugged Cross" 

Remarks 

Song - America 

Closing Selection 



Miss dellille - Mrs. Boyer 
Leader - Mr. Varrichione 
Mrs* Borden - Soprano 
Mrs. Bristol - Alto 
Mr.- Bristol 

:*r. Bristol 
Mr . Boyer 



Mr. Hatch 




Tirs, Borden 


- Soprano 


LErs, Bristol 


- Alto 


Mr. Boyer 





Miss deMille - Mrs. Boyer 



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Chalk drawings by Robert Strong ' 
Woodward and oils by Emile A. Gruppe 
will be hung Hext week at the Myles 
Standish Galleries in Kenmore square. 



Myles Standish Galleries 

Bay State Road and Beacon St 



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HE BOSTON GLOBE— TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 1930 



TOWN MEETING AT SUDBURY IS HELD 

IN BASEMENT OF CHURCH BUILT IN 1776 




Left to Right — Rev George H. Clark, moderator; Hatvey H. Fairbanks, chairman of board of selectmen, 
and Aubrey W. Borde// clerk of selectmen, at meeting yesterday in basement of First Parish Church. 

Special Dispatch to the Globe 

SUDBURY," March 3— The voters of 
this town gathered in the basement of 
the First Parish Church, which was 
erected in 1776, tHis afternoon for the 
annual town meeting. The church pre- 
sented an antique setting for the meet- 
ing, over which Rev George H. Clark 
presided. 

In addition to the election, about 
half the town warrant was passed 



upon before adjournment until March I 
10. The chief discussion at the meet- 
ing concerned the erection of a new j 
town hall, and the article- which re- j 
quested permission or the Legislature 
to borrow above the debt limit for < 
that purpose was passed unanimous- I 

iy. 

A committee of nine members, -.ith 
H. N. Fairbanks, chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen, as chairman, was 
elected to carry on the work of a new 
town hall. 



Officers elected: 

Rev George H. Clark, moderator: Frank 
F. Geary, town clerk; Harland H. Roeers. 
treasurer: Howard C. Burr, tax collector: 
Howard M. Goodnow, Selectman: Webster 
Cutting', assessor: Mrs Philena A. Bartlett. 
School Committee; Seneca W. Hall. Board 
of Health; Harlan H. No.ves. highway sur- 
veyor: Stephen M. W. Gray. Plannine Board: 
Clifford S. Wrisrht. Overseer of Poor: Mrs 
Annie S. Powers. Library Committee. 

Appropriations — Schools. $32,000: bridsres, 
$200; Fire Department, $700: health. 8300 
street lisrhts, $6000; police. $1600: interest 
$3000: new roads. $10,100: library. $500 
tax collector. SS00: Poor Department. $2000 
town debt. $43,000. 




DK3BIEl*£n 



DANCING A CHARTER DAY MINUET IN DORCHESTER 




Left to right: Nadine Young, John Cheney, harotd Slielle y, Jean Wr»ght, Elizabeth Sommers, Andrew Goodspeed, 

Oliver Hoag and Anna 3 lax well. 



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FLAGS AND BELLS 

WILL MARK FETE 

OF CHARTER DAY 

TERCENTENARY I 
PROGRAM OPENS 
THIS MORNING 



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The Governor's message, which 
terms the charter as the "founding of 
free government on this continent" is 
as follows: 

On the fourth day of March in 
the year 1629, a charter granted by 
King Charles I of England to the 
Governor and Company of Massa- 
chusetts Bay in New England, 
"passed the seals" as it is written 
in the ancient formal records, and 
became the frame of government 
for a new state. It is fitting that 
the people of our commonwealth, in 
grateful recognition of the inheri- 
tance of political liberty secured 
by the muninents of constitutional 
law, should on this day of com- 
memoration pause in the activities 
of our ordinary duties and voca- 
tions to reflect upon the signifi- 
cance of that portentous event in 
the history of Massachusetts and 
of the nation. 

HELD TO CHARTER 
Here, for the first time in the 
history of the American colonies, 
a chartered and competent govern- 
ment was actually established with- 
in the territory of its jurisdiction 
and authority. Here, under the 
provisions of this historic charter, 
by authority of the Governor, John 
Winthrop, and of the assistants as- 
sembled in the General Court, was 
created, in all essentials, an inde- 
pendent government of free men. 
For nearly a century and a half, 
as colony and province of the 
Massachusetts Bay, our ancestors 
held steadfastly to their charter 
and their constitutional rights. 
Through the transitions of the vic- 
tories of the war for independence, 



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subject colonists became self-gov- 
erning citizens, and a King gave 
place to a soverign state. 

In this tercentenary year of the 
founding of free government on 
this continent, it is appropriate that 
our people should make fitting rec- 
ognition of the anniversary of this 
event because of its profound 'in- 
fluence upon the history of the 
American republic. 

MAYORS PROCLAMATION 

In taking cognizance of the day May- 
or Curley issued this proclamation: 

It is fitting in this tercentenary 
year that patriotic citizens observe 
this day as one of the important 
days and all are urgently requested 
to recognize this significant anni- 
versary by the display of the na- 
tional and city flags and by the 
ringing of bells and chimes. 

This simple observance has been 
deemed 'he most impressive method 
of focusing public attention upon 
the serious and spiritual aspects 
of the general celebrations that will 
be observed throughout the year. 







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COURTESY OF HENRY FORO 

Jl Man in New England is Collecting Old Millstones 
and Well Stones Weighing tSOO to 3000 Pounds Each 



Even Henry Ford, hard-boiled and intensely prac- 
tical, has joined the grand army of junk hunters. His 
collection at Dearborn, when complete, will cover 125 
acres of ground space. It will fill fifty buildings, and 

present actual living conditions of the early settlers, 
not only their home furnishings but the shops that 
they worked in from 1620 down to date — a graphic 
record of the development of our nation — and, as 
Mr. Ford expresses it, "it will convey more of his- 
tory than the written book." 



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(BOSTON MASSACRE 
MARTYRS HONORED 






Mayor Flays Segregation of 
War Mothers 



Tribute to patriot martyrs and par- 
ticularly to Crispus Attucks, Colored 
leader who was .first to fall, marked 
the observance of the 160th anniversary 
of the Boston Massacre in this city yes- 
terday. 

The exercises began at 10:45 A. M. 
at the scene of the massacre, State and 
Exchange streets; continued at the At- 
tucks grave in the Granary burying 
ground and at the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence tablet on Boston Common. 

Mayor Curley, speaking on the Com- 
mon, expressed his pleasure, in behalf 
of the city, in laying a wreath "symbol- 
lie of the men of a race who helped 
make possible by a baptism of blood 
the organized revolt and laid the found- 
ation of the United States of Amer- 
ica." 

The mayor then flayed the proposed 
segragation of negro war mothers for 
whom is planned a pilgrimage to France 
on a separate ship. He declared that 
absolute equality should be the recog- 
nized order and rule of the life in this 
country and urged a broader, more lib- 
eral, more humane spirit and temper 
than has been displayed In recent years. 



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LOUISBURG SQUARE, THE BOSTON BRAHMIN'S HOLY OF HOLIES, 
VALIANTLY GUARDED BY DIMINUTIVE MARBLE STATUES OF 
COLUMBUS AND ABISTIDES. AT NO. 10 LIVED LOUISA M. ALCOTT 



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REV. DR. LOWE AT 
TREMONT THEATRE 



"Shall AVe Pray?" Subject at 
Noo nday Service 

The Rev. Dr. John Smith Lowe. 
minister of the Church of the Redemp- 
tion, was the noonday speaker at the 
Greater Boston Federation service in 
Tremont Theatre yesterday. 

Dr. Lowe, speaking on the subject 
"Shall We pray?" said that we should 
pray without ceasing. That the man 
who have never obeyed the inspiration 
to pray is biologically defective. That 
in this scientific age we often hear the 
o.uestion "Is there a God to whom I may 
pray?" That "I do not know that there 
is a God" is a thoroughly characteristic 
comment of the day. Reverently and 
respectfully we reply: "Neither do you 
know there is not a God." said Dr. Lowe. 



"When knowledge fails we are going to 
do one of two things. Either we are 
going to make the positive leap of faith 
or the negative leap of denial. Prayer 
is a voluntary act of the soul based 
upon faith and faith is betting your very 
life that a thing is so. God is a Spirit 
and they who worship must worship in 
spirit. If we cannot supply absolute 
definite definitions for our own per- 
sonalities why then do we balk when 
we can't define God. The danger today 
is that we talk too much about prayer 
and do too little praying. Jesus never 
argued about prayer. He prayed. If 
you would know the value, the sweet- 
ness, the comfort and the dynamic 
power of prayer stop doubting and pray 
heartily. The monumental testimony 
of prayerful men is the answer to the 
skeptic. Prayer is the soul's magic dial 
with which it tunes in on this, the blind 
symphony of God's mercy." 



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'I have often read in the biographies of 
great men,' said Mr. Boyer, 'how some 
factor that acted as an inspiration to them 
has been the cause of their success and 
achievement. We might say that inspiration 
is essential to success. That is why we 
fellows in Menlo Park are extremely for- 
tunate; because we have in those sur- 
roundings an atmosphere that is literally 
saturated with the spirit of the man whose 






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birthday we are celebrating today, Thomas 
Edison, and I can think of no finer inspira- 
tion. 

'I do not believe it is possible for a per- 
son to fully appreciate how strong this in- 
fluence really is unless they could work 
there every day as we are. When we fellows 
first started working on our problem, we 
were full of enthusiasm and confident in 
our ability to solve it. After a month of 
negative results, however, our enthusiasm 
faded away, but instead of becoming dis- 
couraged we were aware of this power that 
seemed to fill us with a determination to 
stick to it until we accomplished something 
really worth while. 

That is what I mean by Edison's in- 
spiration — a power that has enabled us 
to see that even though our experiments 
do not turn out as we want them to, they 
are not necessarily failures or useless. We 
have learned that nothing is a failure unless 
we fail to learn something from it. 

'We have already come to recognize 
this fact: That there is enormous potential 
power in everyone, and that if this power 
can be aroused, developed and concentrated 
in the right direction the result will be an 
irresistable force that will overcome all the 
problems of life.' 






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THE BOSTON HERALD, TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 193 



LEVIATHAN AS SEEN FROM TOP OF THE ARMY BASE 




(Picture bs Leslie Jones, Herald staff photographer) 
The big boat arrived yesterday from New York and was floated into dry dock at Sou'h Boston at 6:20 A. M., the opera- 
tion being in charge of Lt. William Kurtz, U. S. X., with 14 tugs assisting the ship into the deck approach. The line- 
will remain here a week or 10 days for semi-annual cleaning and painting, returning to New York to resume sailing 

April 12 to Cherbourg and Southampton. 






LEVIATHAN ARRIVES 
FOR AN OVERHAULING 



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Prominent Shipping Men Aboard Are 
Luncheon Guests Here 

Distinguished shipping executives, 
1 among them J. E. Sheedy, president of 
I the United States Lines; Paul Q. Chap- 
! man, owner of the company, and Com- 
missioners Jefferson Myers, A. H. Den- 
ton and S. S. Sandberg, representing 
the shipping board, who arrived here 
yesterday on the Leviathan from New 
York, were tendered luncheon at the 
Algonquin Club by the maritime asso- 
ciation, F. S. Davis, manager. 
' Several local shipping men also were 
present, among them Gerrit Fort, chair- 
I man of the maritime association gov- 
! erning board; C. E. Ware, Jr., of the 
port authority; Thomas Mullin and 
John Scully of Mayor Curley's publicity 
committee; R. E. Peabody of Rogers & 
Webb; R. Van Ummerson of the Boston 
& Albany railroad. Port conditions 
were discussed with reference to ex- 
panding business of the port. 



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Nearly Opposite YVenham Green 

Every village had its Green, center of 
community interest, nearby the church. 
The Claflin - Richards House, almost 
across the street from "Wenham's Green, 
now is occupied by the Historical Society. 
On certain days visitors arc welcomed. 
This house was built in 1664. Robert 
Macklaffln (the Mack was dropped after 
the first generation) was probably one of 
(he Scotch prisoners captured by Crom- 
well at the Battle of Dunbar in 1650, 
who were sent to Xew England, con- 
signed to Thomas Kemble of Charles- 
town to work for the iron undertakers 
at Lin (Lynn). 

Macklaffln. after living In Wenham for 
ten years, became a landowner and in 
1664 he married and brought his bride 
from Ipswich to this house, which at 
that time comprised only two rooms. 
one above the other like the Balch and 
other houses of that period. In 1673, Rev. 
Joseph Gerrish accepted a call to Wen- 
I ham as pastor and Macklaffln's house 
was purchased for a parsonage. It was 
voted" to build a "Howse eighteen foot 
square and thirteen foot stud" as an 
addition to the original house. Mr. Ger- 
rish remained as pastor for forty-seven 
years, removing to a new parsonage in 
1693. ' A military man of the town. Cap- 
tain Thomas Fiske, purchased the house. 
He liked it chiefly because It was near 
the training field. In 1700 he was ap- 
pointed to keep a school "for the learn- 
ing of children to read and write." From 
175S to 1836 it was owned by Deacon 
John Kemble, Daniel Herrick and Cap- 
lain Uzziel Dodge, second postmaster of 
the town, respectively. 

During Captain Dodge's ownership. 
Miss Elizabeth Shaw of Beverly con- 
ducted a private school and a Sunday 
school In 1836 Captain Edward Kim- 




ball, owner, rented the house to Jabez 
Richards and in 1840 Rlchards's widow 
bought the house. She made many 
changes but the old house has since been 
restored to its former condition. 



The Claflin-Richards House 



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